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It plays out like a scene in a movie: You pack your things and hit the open road with the hopes of reaching out and touching fame, fortune and glory—if only for a moment. Following your favorite band across the country is certainly an adventurous pastime, meaning it can also get expensive pretty quickly. But with a little knowhow and the hook-up with some cheap tickets, you can pull it off and still have enough in your wallet to get home. Here’s how:

cheap tickets-following a band

Strategize carefully

Following a band across the country shouldn’t be done on a whim—otherwise, you may run out of gas, get stranded, or show up to a sold-out show empty-handed. Before you hit the road, you need a plan.

Snag those tickets – for cheap!

The concert tickets should come first, and CheapTickets makes it easy to get into your favorite band’s shows without hurting your wallet. Your safest bet may be starting in your hometown. For example: If you’re a Carrie Underwood fan hailing from Jacksonville, FL, grab tickets to the first stop of her tour for $68. Then, it’s only a short jaunt to Duluth for the second show. Repeat this pattern until you’ve had your fill of Ms. Underwood’s sultry crooning.

Pick your plane, train or automobile

Transportation’s just as important as the concerts themselves. Do your research and see if a cheap car rental or a cheap flight is a better fit for your touring aspirations. You’re not stuck with one or the other throughout the entire duration of your tour, unless you drive your own car.

Budget well —you’ll need that money later

Life on the road can be filled with all sorts of unseen expenses. You’ll likely end up needing a last-minute hotel room in a strange city at least once. But if you budget accordingly and plan your hotel stays in advance, you’ll have plenty of cash left over for any proverbial bumps in the road.

Set aside some cash for (a little) frivolity

Let’s face it—no matter how many band t-shirts you already have, you’ll probably be aching to pick up some new merch. So get yourself something that’ll help you remember this experience! And besides, all budgeting and no play makes for a less-than-stellar trip.

Eat smart

You’ll need lots of energy for traveling, cheering and dancing your butt off, so make sure you can afford to eat enough. If you’re worried about your food budget, grab a few boxes of granola bars and other snacks before you leave home to cheaply tide you over between meals.

Pack light

Unless you’re hitting the road in a caravan, you’ll want to pack light. Even if you plan on touring for a few weeks. This is doubly true if you’re flying, so don’t bring anything more than a carry-on bag. If you need to wash your clothes in a pinch along the way, your hotel room’s sink or tub is the way to go. But if you’re feeling extra fancy, there’s always the laundromat.

Don’t forget that camera

Following a band on tour is probably a once-in-a-lifetime adventure, unless you plan on becoming Beyonce’s personal assistant. So remember to have fun, make great memories, and update your Instagram often—you know, to remind everyone of how jealous they should be.

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Tagged: Cheap Tips, Music, Tips & advice, Uncategorized

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A good musical will make you want to sing, dance, laugh, cry and…travel? Naturally. Some of the world’s most vibrant cities and cultures inspired its most most popular theater acts. These musical destinations are calling (or singing) your name:

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Chicago: ‘Chicago’

Kick off your travels with a city so great—and so infamously gritty—that they wrote an entire musical about it. But things have changed since Chicago’s Prohibition-era storyline, and the city’s feel is now more classically midwestern friendly than crime-ridden, thanks to the store-lined Michigan Avenue and the bars and music venues of neighborhoods like Wicker Park and Lincoln Park. And because of that famous midwestern sensibility, you can soak it all in—and see the show—without breaking the bank.

London: ‘Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street’

Okay, yes, London has inspired some of the most famous musicals ever produced—and plenty of them. But Sweeny Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a new classic, capturing the city’s dark humor and history. Have a spooky, Sweeny Todd-inspired adventure on the cheap while exploring London’s ghost-filled past, haunted buildings and ancient theaters, which are some of the oldest in the world.

Austria: ‘The Sound of Music’

Come see the hills that are alive with The Sound of Music! Although Hollywood glamorized the family’s famous escape from the Nazis—the “hills” were actually more like railroad tracks, reported The History Channel—Austria is still a beautiful country nonetheless, and those beautiful Alps are definitely there, whether the Von Trapps crossed them or not. The city of Salzburg, too, has become a popular tourist spot, where you can see the Von Trapps’ home and other film locations.

Greece: ‘Mamma Mia!’

While ABBA’s music inspired Mamma Mia!, Greece’s obvious natural beauty will inspire you to leave your comfort zone—or your hometown—behind. While any Greek island would be an amazing trip, Skopelos (or Kalokairi, as the play renamed it) is located on the beautiful Aegean Sea. Go see for yourself what everyone was singing about, and you might just burst into song yourself.

Thailand: ‘The King and I’

Here’s an exotic destination for your theater-inspired bucket list: Thailand. You’ll feel like Anna while exploring Eastern culture and this vibrant country, a la The King and I. You may also feel like you won the lottery—Bangkok is both world-renowned and decidedly cheap, despite all the bustle and luxury. If you like taking rides atop elephants, visiting ancient ruins and poking through floating markets, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Thailand is calling your name.

Africa: ‘The Lion King’

Although originally inspired by Shakespeare’s Hamlet, this musical weaves motifs of power and identity into the African landscape instead of Denmark. While you probably won’t see any lions or hyenas singing a little tune, you can see them wander the bush freely in destinations like Kenya and South Africa. Meaning you’ll have some killer photos to make your Instagram followers jealous.

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Tagged: Beach, City, International, Music

Alexander Santo

Alexander Santo

Alexander Santo

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It’s easy to drop a lot of money in the Big Easy, largely due to *ahem* adult beverages. The good news is, it’s also pretty easy not to. The city’s overflowing with cheap eats and things to do, meaning you can pack your itinerary as much as you want. Here’s what to do with 24 hours in New Orleans without breaking the bank.

Start your day with an iconic New Orleans breakfast (7:15—8:15 a.m.)

Yes, 7:15 is early, but the early start—and coffee—will help you get everywhere you want to go today (and account for lines at this famous hotspot). Tuck into some beignets at Café du Monde while sipping a steaming cup of chicory coffee. The pastries’ sweet powdered-sugar blanket will give you plenty of energy for sightseeing, and this cheap breakfast will only set you back around $5–$6.

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Meet some talented locals and catch up on NOLA history (8:15–10:30 a.m.)

Thanks to the St. Louis Cathedral and the beautiful Presbytere, strolling around Jackson Square is sort of like stepping into a fairy-tale world. But in true New Orleans fashion, you’re likely to run into jazz musicians, artists, human statues and other performers along the way—all of which are free to watch, but tipping is the norm. After enjoying a little artistry with your vitamin D, head to the Presbytere museum to learn about Mardi Gras and the effects of Hurricane Katrina on the city ($6 admission).

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Explore the ‘cities of the dead (10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.)

Next up is one of the city’s creepier attractions: its cemeteries. Stroll over to St. Louis Cemetery 1, home of the famous Madame Laveau, or hop on the bright red Canal Street trolley ($1.25 for a one-way ticket) for a quick, cheap trip uptown to St. Louis Cemetery 3. Whichever you choose, you won’t spend a dime tiptoeing around the ornate ‘cities of the dead’ and their crypts and monuments.

Eat a po’boy (12:30-1:30 p.m.)

It’s good, it’s cheap, and it’s right around the corner from St. Louis Cemetery 3. Welcome to casual local hangout Liuzza’s by the Track, which literally invented the BBQ shrimp po’boy ($15.95), making it a must-have menu item. Pair it with a cup of gumbo ($6.95) for a satisfying lunch.

Go window–shopping on Magazine Street (4:30–6:30 p.m.)

Magazine Street’s boutiques and galleries are ripe for window-shopping. Let your credit card rest (or not) and check out the bohemian jewelry at Stella Gray, the designer duds at Azby’s, and the vintage, European wares at Aux Belles Choses. If you need a snack, head to Blue Frog Chocolates and indulge in traditional New Orleans pralines and hand-dipped truffles.

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Stuff yourself with jambalaya (6:30–8:00 p.m.)

Head back to the French Quarter for dinner at the 21+, no-frills Coop’s Place (if you have kids, stick around Magazine Street for the famous oyster joint Casamento’s). Coop’s serves up some of the city’s best jambalaya—here, it’s made with rabbit and sausage ($5.75–$11.95). An appetizer of crabmeat-stuffed jalapeno peppers ($8.95) makes it a feast worthy of budgeting kings.

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Have a drink or three (8:00–10:30 p.m.)

It’s time for that famous New Orleans right of passage—drinking your way down the French Quarter‘s infamous Bourbon Street. We suggest diving into a sweet, rum-filled Hurricane at the bar that created it: Pat O’Brien’s. While you’re at it, request a song from the dueling pianos. And even though it’s technically not on Bourbon Street, we’d suggest splurging at the infamous Carousel Bar at Hotel Monteleone anyway. Jockey for a seat at the rotating carousel bar, if you can, and sip a Vieux Carre ($12), which was invented here.

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End the evening on a high note (10:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m.)

…with some live jazz on Frenchman Street. You can stumble straight onto it from Bourbon Street, provided that you’re walking northeast. The city’s best jazz clubs line this famous musical avenue, which is a lot less raucous than its rowdy neighbor to the south. So grab a drink and settle in at legendary spots like The Spotted Cat and Blue Nile to hear the best New Orleans has to offer. Just know that some places charge cover, and you’ll likely have to buy a drink or two.

Go to sleep (12:30a.m.)

It’s back to the hotel with you! Whether you’re heading for the airport in the morning, or gearing up to do it all over again, you’ll need your beauty sleep.

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Tagged: City, Food & drink, Music

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Football season’s in full swing, and that means three things: beer, good food and tailgating. If you’re willing to go where the game takes you, here are the best NFL cities for enjoying all three without breaking the bank.

Tampa, Florida

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If you love fishing and football, Tampa may be the NFL town for you. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers—and their massive pirate ship, complete with animatronic parrot—play at Raymond James Stadium, tucked in right next to Al Lopez Park and its fishing ponds. Old Tampa and Hillsborough Bays are also close, offering dolphin cruises and watersports galore—all with a hefty dose of Florida’s famously free vitamin D, which makes for some pretty pleasant tailgating.

Denver, Colorado

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Ever heard of a little team called the Broncos? They hail from Denver’s Sports Authority Field at Mile High, where you can tailgate indoors at onsite bars like the Mile High Cross Bar and the 50 Yard Bar. Later, drop exactly zero dollars to take a brewery tour, explore the famous Red Rocks or pay tribute to your favorite locals at the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame. Walking in the 100-million-year-old footsteps of dinosaurs at Dinosaur Ridge is also a very free, very worth-it option.

Indianapolis, Indiana

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The Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Monument Circle, the Dallara IndyCar Factory…all these attractions are great, but this town’s main draw is, and will always be, the Colts. But since you’ll need to do something after the game anyway, you can take a totally free stroll along Lockerbie Square’s historic cobblestone streets or browse the clever insights and turns of phrase found in the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

Baltimore, Maryland

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The city that brought us Billie Holiday, John Waters and the Star Spangled Banner is also home to the Ravens. Their M&T Bank Stadium is just a stone’s throw from one of Charm City’s darkest attractions—the house where Edgar Allen Poe grew up. Baltimore also offers heaps of free things to do, including the beautiful Basilica and the Baltimore Museum of Art. Once most businesses have closed up shop for the night, head to the historic Fell’s Point or Canton districts for some live music.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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Pittsburgh nails the trifecta of American pastimes: gambling, sausage, and, of course, football. After working up an appetite by watching the Steelers dominate at the deliciously named Heinz Field, you can enjoy some cheap, German eats at Deutschtown or check out the Andy Warhol Museum and ToonSeum, dedicated to the art of cartoons. Best of all, the Rivers Casino is a few blocks from the stadium.

Cleveland, Ohio

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 You can pick up your Cleveland Browns jerseys and hoodies at the FirstEnergy Stadium pro shop before the game, and show your love to the locals afterwards while digging into some cheap, satisfying eats and beer at the many bars and restaurants around the stadium. Once you’ve had your fill, hit up the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame museum or the always-free Cleveland Museum of Art to see works by Goya and Mondrian.

Green Bay, Wisconsin      

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It doesn’t get more iconic than the Green Bay Packers, and their eponymous city dishes out as much competitive spirit as it does good, cheap fun. Scarf down some pork-belly tacos and venison sloppy joes at Lambeau Field’s onsite eatery before checking out the Packers Hall of Fame. Or head to New Zoo for some inexpensive thrills—here, you can feed friendly giraffes and play on an aerial adventure course.

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Tagged: City, Florida, Sports

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Cheap Right Now gives a snapshot of a cheap weekend getaway each month.

People around the country will tell you that there’s no better place in the world to be than downtown Chicago in the summertime. It’s true, Chicago summers are enticing and overflowing with festivals, free activities and restaurant patios. But Chicago in November (and all of fall) is just as captivating. The leaves are losing their grip on the trees and the city is beginning to illuminate with that magical holiday glow. The lights glisten longer amid an early nightfall, and the warmth of city’s impeccable food and drink scene warms that November chill.

Find our promo code of the week and Chicago hotel deals

Courtesy of Steven Vance.

Courtesy of Steven Vance.

Plane, train or automobile — Take your pick. Chicago is a major transportation hub with main veins leading to it from all over the country. It has two international airports, O’Hare and Midway, with trains providing easy access downtown, and marks a crossroads for several interstates, making travel by car easy as well. It’s also accessible by bus, Amtrak and even boat, if you are feeling really adventurous.

 

Courtesy of Ron Cogswell.

Courtesy of Ron Cogswell.

Cheap local transit — Most Chicagoans don’t own cars, so getting around town is a piece of cake. Take the Chicago Transit Authority buses or trains, also known as the L, anywhere in the city for $2.25 a ride. If you want to go to the suburbs, Metra trains can take you there. Chicago is walkable though, so for the cheapest form of transit, use your feet and see the sights. Divvy, Chicago’s bikeshare program, is another good option if the weather holds up, but prices just went up to $9.95 for a 24-hour pass, and it will charge you a fee if you don’t dock the bike every 30 minutes. 

Thanksgiving Day Parade. Courtesy of Randy Escalada

Thanksgiving Day Parade. Courtesy of Randy Escalada

Stare on State Street — Chicago’s annual Thanksgiving Day parade is not to be missed if you are in town for the holiday. It starts at 8 a.m. and takes over State Street from Congress Parkway to Randolph Street. Watch floats, giant balloons, marching bands and local celebrities traverse downtown. If your neck starts to hurt from looking up, there will be plenty of people watching to do as well. And all that entertainment won’t cost youa dime.

 

Courtesy of Ryan Dickey.

Courtesy of Ryan Dickey.

Taste fall in the alcohol — Revolution Brewing, one of Chicago’s premier breweries, makes a mean Oktoberfest. And fortunate for fellow beer lovers, Revolution offers free tours of its production facility at 3340 N. Kedzie on a first-come, first-serve basis. The tours fill up fast, especially on the weekends, so get there early. It comes with a tasting and is connected to its tap room, which serves many brews that never get bottled and distributed to the public. Revolution brews very seasonally, so you should be able to appreciate fall with every sip.

Find discounted tickets for Chicago Bulls games

Courtesy of Ally Marotti.

Courtesy of Ally Marotti.

Dine on doughnuts — The fierce doughnut competition in the city has raised the bar quite high for the delicious treats, far above and beyond what you could get at any run-of-the-mill doughnut joint. Specialty doughnut shops pepper the city and are worth waiting in line for. Try Firecakes Donuts, Stan’s Donuts, Do-Rite Donuts, the Doughnut Vault or Glazed and Infused. Although prices at these shops are higher than most, getting one doughnut as breakfast is a cheaper option than an elaborate brunch elsewhere, and these things are undoubtedly gourmet. If you want to cut costs even further, stop at any of the dozens of Dunkin’ Donuts.

 

View of Chicago from the water taxi. Courtesy of Ally Marotti.

View of Chicago from the water taxi. Courtesy of Ally Marotti.

Take in the views by sea — Chicago’s geography lends itself quite nicely to boat rides, and the options for those longing to set sail are many. There are architecture tours, sunset cruises and other passenger barges. But those options can cost upwards of $40 a person. Take a water taxi from Navy Pier to the museum campus through Chicago Harbor for a mere $8 (which would likely be cheaper than if a normal taxi drove you that distance), and take in sweeping views of the skyline. Go on a warmer day since passengers are exposed to the elements during the trip. Rides are short, though, so you won’t be bitten too hard by that November chill. Pro tip: If you aren’t into the boat thing, walk out to the Adler Planetarium for more great views of the city.

 

Courtesy of Daniel X. O'Neil.

Courtesy of Daniel X. O’Neil.

Take your kinder to Christkindlmarket — The city sets up a traditional German Christmas market in Daley Plaza in the heart of the city, opening on Nov. 20. Try some German mulled wine or shop around and get a head start on some of your Christmas shopping. Visiting the Christkindlmarket is a sacred holiday tradition to most Chicagoans, so make yourself at home and stop by.

 

Courtesy of Thomas Hawk.

Courtesy of Thomas Hawk.

BYOB — A spectacular way to save money but still experience Chicago’s world-renowned culinary scene are restaurants that allow patrons to bring their own alcohol. You’ll savebig on avoiding paying the premiums restaurants charge for a glass of wine, and these places usually have the best vibes. Dozens of sushi places across the city are BYOB. Other favorites include 90 Miles Cuban Cafe, which has a couple locations throughout the city, and Chilam Balam, a Mexican restaurant in Lakeview that is constantly changing its menu.

 

Views from the Signature Lounge. Courtesy of Salil Wadhavkar.

Views from the Signature Lounge. Courtesy of Salil Wadhavkar.

On top of the world — If seeing the city from above is a privilege reserved for those in planes and penthouses, the Signature Lounge on the 96th floor of the John Hancock building is a loop hole. This place sells drinks and appetizers that are slightly overpriced, but the views are stunning, allegedly allowing vistas of three states. Other observation decks in skyscrapers offer similar views, but most charge an entry fee of at least $20 per person. The Signature Lounge is free, besides, of course, the drink you’ll likely have there.

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Tagged: Cheap of the Month, Food & drink, Holidays, Off-season, Seasonal, Uncategorized

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Spending so much on a Halloween costume that you have to dip into your travel fund? Now that’s scary. Fortunately, these DIY costume ideas leave plenty of cash for your next wanderlust fix while letting everyone know that travel is your idea of a treat.

Parisian mimeA striped shirt and a beret are all you really need to channel your inner Marcel Marceau. If you want to go all out, add a scarf, white gloves and some pale makeup.

Credit dresscorilynn.com.

Credit dresscorilynn.com.

Venetian gondolier: If you’d rather apply that striped shirt to a costume that doesn’t render you mute for the evening, then try this Italian idea. A straw hat, red sash, red scarf and oar (cardboard if you must) complete the look.

Credit: littlepim.com.

Credit: littlepim.com.

Waldo and Carmen Sandiego: Where in the world is this adventure-seeking couple off to? Anywhere they want. Striped shirt, hat and glasses for him. Red trench coat, yellow scarf and hat for her. Done.

Credit Ashley Baccam.

Credit Ashley Baccam.

Travel bug: Here’s the perfect getup for a witty wanderer. Drape yourself in an old map, and attach pipe cleaners to a headband for homemade antennae. For bonus points, complete the look with a set of store-bought wings.

Credit kianablaire.com.

Credit kianablaire.com.

Pizza rat: There are so many dignified costume ideas around the Big Apple—Statue of Liberty, a firefighter, Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. But no. This is the year of the pizza rat. Remember that New York City rodent who was caught on video carrying a slice of pizza down the stairs of a subway station? No need to get fancy with the costume. A simple gray sweatsuit, mouse ears and oversized slice of pizza made from poster board will do the trick.

Credit: halloweencostumes.com.

Credit: halloweencostumes.com.

Royal family: The family that dresses up together, stays together all night. To make like Queen Elizabeth, just hit up a thrift store (or your grandma’s closet) for some matronly duds and a matching handbag. For the royal guards, embellish a red jacket, step into some black pants—er, trousers—and for the hat, glue some black fleece to a cardboard tube, and affix with a gold cord. Bloody brilliant.

Credit costume-works.com.

Credit costume-works.com.

Tagged: Holidays, International, New York City, Uncategorized

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With so many factors constantly threatening to throw off your itinerary when you travel, the last thing you need is an added uncertainty surrounding your arrival to the airport. These airports and transit systems make it easy for the traveler needing to get from the airport to the city center cheap and fast.

 

Courtesy of Rhys A.

Courtesy of Rhys A.

O’Hare International Airport — Chicago, Illinois

Although O’Hare is known for its delays and overcrowded terminals, getting there is one thing you won’t have to worry about. The Blue Line on the Chicago Transit Authority’s El train goes from O’Hare and stops all along the way, eventually ending up right downtown. The train runs every couple of minutes and it only costs $2.50 for a ride. Midway, Chicago’s other airport, is also connected to downtown by the Orange Line, and just as easily accessible.

Courtesy of SimonRahn.

Courtesy of SimonRahn.

El Prat Airport — Barcelona, Spain

The RENFE train runs from the airport to downtown about every 30 minutes. It’s a nearly 25-minute ride through the Catalan countryside. Get off at Sants Estacio, Passeig de Gracia or the Clot stop, and then you can take the city Metro to wherever you specifically want to go. If you are heading to the airport, you’ll want to catch the train at any of those stations and get off at the Aeropuerto stop. Pretty simple. Tickets for individual journeys cost just over 2.

Courtesy of Ron Reiring.

Courtesy of Ron Reiring.

Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport — Minneapolis, Minnesota

You can take your pick how you get to this airport: bus, train or bike. In such a physically fit city, authorities felt it necessary to connect Terminal 2 to a bike path that leads to downtown Minneapolis. (There’s also a 1.4-mile walking path inside Terminal 1). Light rail trains run every 10 minutes during peak hours, when fares are $2.25, and 15 minutes during off hours, when fares are $1.75. The trains connect to 17 locations, including downtown Minneapolis, downtown St. Paul and the nearby Mall of America.

Courtesy of Thomas Depenbusch.

Courtesy of Thomas Depenbusch.

Cologne Bonn Airport — Cologne, Germany

The train from Cologne’s city center to the airport drops passengers off right in the middle of the airport at the Intercity-Express (ICE) station. When heading downtown, take the S-train right to the city center. The ride will take about 20 to 30 minutes and stop four orfive times before arriving right downtown. The cost is about €2.60.

Courtesy of Josh Hallett.

Courtesy of Josh Hallett.

Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport — Atlanta, Georgia

In an airport that is so big it has it’s own zip code, getting to and from it without hassle is key. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (also known affectionately as MARTA) runs trains between the airport and other stops throughout Atlanta frequently, starting at 5 a.m. on weekdays and 6 a.m. on weekends until 1 a.m. every night. If you’re heading to the airport, it’ll drop you right inside the domestic terminal. Rides are $2.50.

Tagged: City, Flights, International, Last minute travel, Tips & advice

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Airports wrote the book on overpriced food. Not getting your fill before you go through security, or not packing enough non-liquid snacks, could mean breaking the bank before you even take off. In the event that you didn’t have time to pack your own grub, traveling on a budget means crossing your fingers and hoping the airline you chose has some complimentary goodies for you. If you really played your cards right, those free treats will actually taste good. Here’s a list of the five best free airplane snacks around. 

Delta serves branded Biscoff cookies. Courtesy of m01229.

Delta serves branded Biscoff cookies. Courtesy of m01229.

1.) Biscoff cookies — The popularity of this delicious little cookie spread like wildfire in the U.S. after airlines began serving it. Until then, it was a treat reserved for Europeans, best enjoyed dunked in coffee. It’s like a gingerbread/shortbread fusion, not too indulgent and just sweet enough. Delta serves a version that has its logo embossed on the cookie, and it should go splendidly with the Starbucks it now serves on all flights. And we can all thank our lucky stars that plenty of retailers in the U.S. now carry Biscoff, so we can get that airplane delight without traveling.

 

Courtesy of Faisal Akram.

Courtesy of Faisal Akram.

2.) Free alcohol — Now here is a rarity. Horizon Air and Skywest, sister carriers of Alaska Airlines, serve complimentary free craft beer and wine on nearly every flight. This is a service those first-class flyers are used to, but it’s novel to us plebeians. The crew picks one craft beer and one wine to serve on each flight. The libations are local to Alaska. United Airlines also offers complimentary house wine and beer for economy passengers on flights between the U.S. and Argentina, Brazil and Chile.

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3.) Pretzels — When you reach peak altitude, there’s really only three food groups that matter: salty, sweet and alcoholic. The pretzel is the Sultan of Salt. After you’ve dished out $6 for a beer, getting a free little packet of these munchies will feel like Christmas morning. ‘Free’ being the key word here. Delta has your back once again for these complimentary noshes. 

 

Terra Blues Potato Chips. Courtesy of Urbanfoodie33.

Terra Blues Potato Chips. Courtesy of Urbanfoodie33.

4.) Blue chipsJetBlue has created a bit of a cult following for Terra Blues Potato Chips. Every flier gets a personal-sized bag of the chips, made from naturally blue potatoes. They are a bit salty and nutty, and you can feel good about them since they are all natural. Or at least a little better than you would after other airline snacks.  

Courtesy of Daniella Segura.

Courtesy of Daniella Segura.

5.) Peanuts — We’d be remiss not to give this classic in-flight snack a shout out. Peanuts are nearly as synonymous with flights as they are with baseball. In the days of yore they were almost always free available. Now you’ll only be lucky enough to get these little packages salty goodness of select airlines like Delta. Peanuts are also a healthier option than it’s rival, pretzels. Hearty? Not really, but at least eating them will kill five minutes while you stare out the window.

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Tagged: Flights, Food & drink, FREE!

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When you’re prepping for a flight there’s a few things you always know to bring: a few magazines or a book to keep you busy, headphones to listen to music or drown out any annoying neighbors and a phone charger. These are crucial, but there is so much more you can do to make traveling go as smooth as possible without breaking the bank.

Luggage cup holder Juggling a suitcase, a purse, my boarding pass,and an ID while navigating an unfamiliar airport should be an Olympic sport. Add in a cup of coffee and it’s a recipe for a disaster, or at least a few stains. Now you can buy a traveling cup holder  from a company called tugo that attaches to the handles of your luggage to free up a hand without sacrificing the caffeine. Price: $12.95

tugo drink holder on suitcase

Photo courtesy of Tugo

Portable charger Trying to find a working outlet that hasn’t already been overtaken by other people is some sort of airport Hunger Games. Some places are awesome and have ample outlets, others not so much. If you’re going to an airport or terminal you aren’t familiar with, always bring a portable charger just to be safe. There are a ton of these on the market and cost about $10 and up.

anker portable charger, ultra compact silver

Photo courtesy of Anker

Digital luggage scale There is always that person in your group who overpacks for a three-day trip or gambles with the luggage weight requirement. A very cool way to keep stay on track with packing, especially for the return journey if you picked up some souvenirs, is with one of these Balanzza digital scales. It’s small enough to fit in your pocket and costs less than most baggage fees, around $20 online.

Headphone splitter  If you’re traveling with a group, or especially kids, it’s smart to bring an earphone splitter so you can watch movies or listen to music with others. Instead of just being able to plug in one set of headphones, you’ll be able to share with a buddy. The tech company Belkin makes several of versions of these, with a splitter for two headphones or a wheel for five. Either way, it will run you somewhere in the neighborhood of $5.

Belkin headphone splitter white

Photo courtesy of Belkin

Tech stand   Nothing will distract you from a two-hour movie like having to hold the phone up to your face the entire time or the glare from looking at an angled screen. Invest in a stand to prop your smartphone or tablet up on your seat tray so you can watch through the flight with ease. For a solid combination of study and compact, try a the GripTight Micro Stand from JOBY. Price: $29.95

How to Use the JOBY GripTight Micro Stand from JOBY Inc on Vimeo.

Tagged: Cheap Tips, Flights, Tips & advice, Uncategorized

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Rewards programs and memberships can seem like a scam, and plenty of them are. But some are actually pretty legit, and could prove beneficial, especially during trip planning, and it can pay to not let your eyes glaze over at the checkout line. Booking trips is a lot more fun when it’s not putting such a huge dent in your wallet. So next time the clerk is making a pitch for you to join her company’s rewards program, pay attention. It could save you some serious cash. Here’s a look at five rewards programs or memberships that could make your upcoming trip slightly less expensive.

 

Courtesy of Veggiefrog.

Courtesy of Veggiefrog.

REI membership — $20

Heading out for some adventure? Becoming an REI member will likely be beneficial for all your outdoorsy needs. It costs $20 to join, and it’s worth it, as members are held in high regard at this company. Each March, members get 10 percent back on almost all the purchases they made at REI that year. So if you plan on forking out $200 for equipment, the membership has paid for itself. Members also enjoy discounts on trips and excursions booked through REI, and in-store discounts, including bike and ski shop services. Some ski resorts also offer discounted lift tickets to REI members. REI has a great return policy in general, but being a member makes taking equipment back even easier. So if your hiking boots wore out a little too quickly or the hiking pants you bought didn’t fit like you thought they would, REI will take care of you.

 

Courtsy of Wetwebwork.

Courtsy of Wetwebwork.

Spotify Premium — $9.99

What’s a trip without some quality tunes? Spotify is available for free, but for your travels you’ll likely want to invest in Premium. It allows you to stream music without an internet connection, which is key when traveling to far-flung places. It’s $9.99 a month, and those intervals will make it easy to cancel if you want to just sign up for the service during your trip only. You can try it for free for 30 days, and students get a 50 percent discount.

 

Courtesy of Josué Goge.

Courtesy of Josué Goge.

Barnes & Noble membership — $25

If you’re beach bound and need a some good reads to take with you, a Barnes & Noble membership may be the way to go, especially if you aren’t the type of person that likes to wait for new best sellers to come out in paperback. It costs $25 a year to be a B&N member,and perks include 40 percent of hardcover best sellers, 10 percent off almost everything else (including treats at the cafe), and free shipping in under three days. Be careful though — the membership automatically renews each year, so remember to cancel if you only want in for 12 months.

 

Courtesy of Xlibber.

Courtesy of Xlibber.

Cheap Tickets rewards program (CheapCa$h) — Free

One of the best things about flight reward programs is that it costs you nothing more than you were already going to spend. Cheap Tickets’ reward program CheapCash gives you what they call CheapCash every time you book a flight. You can then turn around and use that CheapCash on hotel bookings. You have to use the CheapCash within 30 days, but there’s literally no downside to this one. Make sure to keep checking their website for special deals and promotions, which run often. PROMO CODE HERE?

 

CTIXblog CTA _ cheapcash

Tagged: Cheap Tips, City, Flights, FREE!, Last minute travel, Tips & advice