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Note: All travel is subject to frequently-changing governmental restrictions—please check federal, state, and local advisories before scheduling trips. 

Few things are more mesmerizing and awe-inspiring than watching a waterfall. Across these United States, there are plenty of places to see the beauty of tons of cascading water dropping majestically from great heights. Plus, getting to a waterfall can often be done by hiking, walking, or merely parking your car, so you should be able to find falls that suit almost every level of accessibility. Next time you’re looking for a gorgeous, calming view, put these popular waterfalls on your travel list.

RELATED: 9 travel myths you shouldn’t believe

Niagara Falls: Canada and New York

Luna Island / New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

Lining the U.S. and Canadian border, this world-famous attraction includes three waterfalls: the American Falls, the Bridal Veil Falls, and the Canadian Horseshoe Falls. On the American side, head to the Cave of the Winds, which by elevator goes down into Niagara Gorge to observe the falls from the Hurricane Deck. And go for a cruise on the Maid In The Mist, a long-time favorite boat ride along the gorge’s waters.

Find hotels near Niagara Falls here.

Kent Falls: Connecticut

Courtesy Connecticut Office of Tourism

These waters within Kent Falls State Park in Litchfield County cascade down from a mountain stream of Kent Falls Brook, a tributary of the Housatonic River. Divided into upper and lower waterfalls, the falls are accompanied by a steep and winding trail that can be hiked up to see more vantage points. Kent Falls State Park also has a small covered bridge overlooking the brook, large grassy fields, and picnic tables and barbecue fire pits.

Book a great place to stay near Kent Falls here.

Salt Creek Falls: Oregon

Based in Willamette National Forest, the Salt Creek Falls are said to be Oregon’s second-highest single drop waterfall (after Multnomah Falls) with a surge of 50,000 gallons per minute. What also makes visiting these falls awesome is that they have a wheelchair-accessible observation platform just 50 yards from the parking lot and has railings that accommodate wheelchair sightlines. There are two trails to take: One is a loop gravel trail with interpretive signage and many vantage points, while the other is a steep trail from the platform to the base of the falls.

Find your accommodations near Salt Creek here.

Gorman Falls: Texas

Earl Nottingham, TPWD

These waterworks in Central Texas are located in Colorado Bend State Park in Bend, which is about a two-hour drive northwest of Austin. Considered to be a “living” waterfall, Gorman Falls is noted as getting bigger due to its water having a high concentration of carbon dioxide that runs through the area’s limestone deposits. Get there on a three-mile round trip hike via a route that includes rocky terrain that leads up to the 70-foot tall spring-fed sight.

Book a lovely hotel near Gorman Falls here.

Burney Falls: California

As the centerpiece of McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park in Shasta County, just over an hour’s drive north from Redding, Burney Falls is a neat example of a waterfall. A short walk from a parking lot, these 129-foot falls are fed by underground springs and flow at 100 million gallons daily. Go along a shared traffic one-mile loop trail (you may come across horses and other people) where you can hike up to view the top of the falls.

Your hotel in Burney Falls awaits right here.

Ruby Falls: Tennessee

Chattanooga CVB

This one has a neat twist. It’s the tallest and deepest underground waterfall in the U.S. that’s open to the general public. Discovered by accident in 1928, these falls are located 1,120 feet beneath the summit of Lookout Mountain, a natural tourist attraction in Chattanooga. You’ll reach them first by descending 26 stories by elevator and then be led by a guided walk along a cavern path where you’ll also spot unique cave formations.

Find a great place to stay near Ruby  Falls here.

Minnehaha Falls: Minnesota

In Minneapolis’ Minnehaha Falls Regional Park, this 53-foot urban waterfall reflects its location’s name, which comes from the Dakota language and means water. Visitors can take the stairs to view the falls in two different ways: walking up to witness the falls from above, where the waters descend from Minnehaha Creek or taking them down the bluff to view the falls from the bottom and then following the creek as it winds its way to the convergence with the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers.

ʻAkaka Falls: Hawaiʻi

Hawaii Tourism Authority / Kazuya Kajita

At ʻAkaka Falls State Park, on the northeastern Hilo Coast on the island of Hawaiʻi, you can not only see ʻAkaka Falls but also another waterfall. Reach both of them via a short (0.4-mile) uphill trail through a lush tropical rainforest that’s full of wild orchids, bamboo groves and other vegetation. Along the way, see Kahuna Falls, Hawaii’s tallest sheer drop waterfall, and also ʻAkaka Falls, which plunges 442 feet into a stream-eroded gorge.

Turner Falls: Oklahoma

Courtesy of Chickasaw Country

Set in the heart of Chickasaw Country’s Arbuckle Mountains, these waterfalls in Southcentral Oklahoma are quite the centerpiece at Turner Falls Park. The 77-foot waterfall drops into a natural swimming pool, and visitors to the park can have some playtime in the water within multiple designated swimming areas. They can also head out on hiking trails and explore the park’s three caves.

Looking Glass Falls: North Carolina

Flowing through the Pisgah National Forest in Western North Carolina, Looking Glass Falls gets its name association from Looking Glass Rock. During winter, water from a creek freezes on the rock’s sides and then glistens in the sunlight like a mirror or looking glass.

Sitting Bull Falls: New Mexico

New Mexico TRUE

Located within a canyon in Lincoln National Forest, Sitting Bull Falls is a series of waterfalls fed by springs and with a 150-foot-high drop. Its Recreation Area also provides fun times, with cabanas with picnic tables, charcoal grills, and a paved trail through the canyon ending at the falls.

Tagged: California, Cheap City, USA, Cheap Tips, Destinations, Hawaii, Texas, Texas, Top 10 list, Types of Travel

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