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Note: All travel is subject to frequently-changing governmental restrictions—please check federal, state, and local advisories before scheduling trips.

If there’s one thing you retained from English lit class, it’s that setting is one of the key aspects of a story. So it’s understandable that authors often invoke hotels, which open up a world of possibilities and allows for different types of characters to enter/exit. If the hotels below sound familiar, it’s probably because you read about them in a notable novel. Whether it’s a psychedelic romp at a Vegas Strip resort or a Roaring 20’s rager at New York’s. Plaza Hotel, visit for yourself to experience these hotels that appear in many of your favorite novels and short stories.

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Hotel del Coronado: San Diego

Hotel Del Coronado, San Diego, California

Hard to tell if you’re in sun city or the Land of Oz at this iconic hotel, which served as the inspiration for The Wizard of Oz. In fact, author Frank L. Baum was a frequent guest at “The Del” in the early 1900s, and it inspired his vision of Emerald City. Located steps from the ocean on Coronado Island  near downtown San Diego, its opulence has to be seen to be believed. You’ll want to admire the crown-shaped chandeliers designed by the author himself, as well as the hotel’s signature red turrets, and never once want to click your heels and go home.

Book Hotel del Coronado, Curio Collection by Hilton here!

Circus Circus: Las Vegas

Circus Circus, Las Vegas

Take a trip to the wild side with Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, a drug and alcohol-fueled piece of gonzo journalism. In the book, author Hunter S. Thompson and his attorney zig zag across the Mojave Desert in the early 1970s, eventually making their way to Sin City. As they trash one hotel room after another, Thompson name-checks numerous Vegas hotels (most of which are now gone), including still-standing Strip icon Circus Circus. Today the carnival-like resort is an affordable and kid-friendly North Strip option featuring circus acts, arcade games, a rollercoaster, and of course, a casino. For extra credit, see if you can spot the author in the film version of the book.

Book Circus Circus Hotel, Casino & Theme Park here!

The Plaza Hotel: New York City

Plaza Hotel, NYC, New York

Built in 1907, The Plaza Hotel was a popular haunt of F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda, and the author famously set the climactic confrontation scene in his literary masterpiece The Great Gatsby inside one of the hotel’s guest rooms. Today, The Plaza offers the Fitzgerald Suite, a chic space overflowing with Jazz Age energy. Bookshelves proudly showcase the complete works of both husband and wife, and chandeliers clink like champagne glasses. You may also know that The Plaza is home to fictional resident Eloise, a children’s book character whose precociousness has inspired its own suite with pink decor by designer Betsey Johnson.

Book The Plaza Hotel in New York here!

 

Heathman Hotel: Portland, OR

Heathman Hotel, Portland, Oregon

You may be ashamed to admit it, but any reader worth their blindfold and paddle has indulged their curiosity at least a little a bit after reading Fifty Shades of Grey by E. l. James. Portland’s Heathman Hotel is a key player in a few of the scenes from this erotic novel, including a steamy elevator sesh. Located near legendary Powell’s Books, the Heathman is also known for its epic library, which at two stories high houses more than 2,700 books, including many signed first editions. So whether you are looking to appease your inner bookworm or explore your debaucherous side, check this hotel out. Just be sure to remember your safe word.

Book The Heathman Hotel here!

 

The Pontchartrain Hotel: New Orleans

The historic Pontchartrain Hotel, situated in the Garden District of New Orleans, is where famed playwright Tennessee Williams often stayed. So it’s no wonder that this timeless hotel, conveniently located along the tree-lined St. Charles Avenue streetcar line, inspired A Streetcar Named Desire, which he penned while staying there. Raise a glass of champagne and toast to another of Williams’ plays at the Hot Tin-Rooftop Bar, with its stunning views of the Mississippi River and downtown. The hotel underwent a major renovation about five years ago, which updated its amenities while maintaining its flapper-era origins.

Book The Pontchartrain Hotel here!

Baron’s Cove: Sag Harbor, NY

Baron's Cove, Sag Harbor, New York

The Hamptons may be considered a playground for the rich and famous, but Sag Harbor, a small hamlet perched at the end of Long Island, was once a hotspot for literary geniuses, including John Steinbeck, Herman Melville, and Langston Hughes. With his wife Elaine and his fluffy French Poodle Charley by his side, Steinbeck was a frequent guest at the original Baron’s Cove resort, and began the journey that he documents in his road trip travelogue Travels with Charley in Sag Harbor. This luxurious harborside inn feels like home, and with their “Travels With Charley” package, you can pamper your pup with his own dog bed and treats.

Book Baron’s Cove here!

Hotel Monteleone: New Orleans

Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, Louisiana

A favorite of writers such as Truman Capote, William Faulkner, and Ernest Hemingway, Hotel Monteleone is one of only three hotels in the United States to have received the prestigious Literary Landmark designation. And for good reason: It has served as the backdrop in more than 170 novels and stories. The revolving Carousel Bar has been memorialized in short stories by Hemingway (“Night Before Battle”) and Eudora Welty (“The Purple Hat”), and with its Literary Suites pays homage to six Southern authors. Stroll through the memorabilia-filled lobby and sidle up to the bar, sipping your drink as you rotate around the room.

Book Hotel Monteleone here!

 

Tagged: Beach, California, Cheap Tips, City, Destinations, Las Vegas, New Orleans, New York City, Types of Travel

Note: CheapTickets compensates authors for their writings appearing on this site.

Danielle Bauter

Danielle Bauter

Danielle Bauter

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