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  Home / Flights on Delta Airlines / Delta Airlines Flights from Panama City, Panama (PTY) to Atlanta (ATL)

Delta Airlines Flights from Panama City, Panama (PTY) to Atlanta (ATL)

As part of booking roundtrip flights which depart from US airports, Orbitz is pleased to offer airline tickets on Delta Airlines, which operates a daily non-stop flight from Panama City, Panama (PTY) to Atlanta (ATL) regularly scheduled to depart at 8:30am and arrive at 12:30pm. Usually a Boeing 757 is flown for this route. Generally, a movie is offered on this route. The average travel time from Panama City, Panama to Atlanta, GA is 4 hours.

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Regularly Scheduled Flights to Atlanta (ATL) from Panama City, Panama (PTY)
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During your Atlanta vacation, don't miss these great establishments and attractions:

Center for Puppetry Arts
Don't miss this place if you're traveling with the kids. In fact, you might not want to miss it even without kids in tow. The center is dedicated to expanding public awareness of puppetry as a fine art and to presenting all of its international and historic forms. Opened in 1978, with Kermit the Frog cutting the official ribbon (he had a little help from the late Jim Henson), it contains a 300-seat theater, a smaller theater, gallery space, and a permanent museum. The puppet shows are marvelous -- sophisticated, riveting, full-stage productions with elaborate scenery. Some are family oriented; others, with nighttime showings, are geared to adults. Call ahead to find out what's on; reservations are essential. You can also call a week or so in advance to enroll yourself or your kids in a puppet-making workshop.The center's permanent exhibit, "Puppets, The Power of Wonder," is stunning, featuring one of the largest and finest puppet collections in North America. The exhibit includes such treasures as ritualistic African figures, Punch and Judy, Henson's Pigs in Space, turn-of-the-century Thai shadow puppets, Indonesian wayang golek puppets used to tell classic stories (a centuries-old tradition), Chinese hand puppets, rod-operated marionettes from all over Europe, original Muppets, pre-Colombian clay puppets that were used in religious ceremonies circa A.D. 1200, and Turkish shadow figures made of dried animal skins. Visitors have the opportunity to use joysticks to manipulate over 350 of these puppets. A video hosted by Jim Henson provides an overview of puppetry and takes visitors around the world to meet masters of the art. Another gallery features visiting exhibits from all over the world. Reservations are required for guided tours of "Puppets, The Power of Wonder"; the tour lasts about an hour.The gift shop is like no other, with oodles of marionettes, one-of-a-kind handmade puppets, masks, videos, and other related items.

Georgia State Capitol
It wasn't until after the Civil War (1868) that Atlanta became, once and for all, the state capital; its present capitol building, completed July 4, 1889, was hailed as a testament to the city's recovery. Modeled after the nation's Capitol, another neoclassical edifice atop a "crowning hill," its 75-foot dome, covered in gold leaf and topped by a Statue of Freedom, is a major Atlanta landmark. The building is fronted by a massive four-story portico with a pediment supported by six Corinthian columns set on large stone piers. In the rotunda, with its soaring 237-foot ceiling, are busts of famous Georgians, including signers of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The governor's office is off the main hall. The capitol building's public spaces are currently being restored to their 1889 grandeur.Grand staircases in both wings rise to the third floor, where you'll enter the House of Representatives, and, across the hall, the Senate chambers. The legislature meets for 40 days, beginning the second Monday in January (it can also be called into special sessions); all of its sessions are open to the public. The fourth floor houses legislative galleries and the Georgia Capitol Museum, with exhibits on cotton, peach, and peanut growing; cases of mounted birds, fish, deer, insects, and other species native to Georgia; rocks and minerals; American Indian artifacts; and more. Note, too, the museum displays on the first floor.Tours begin on the main floor, and this level also serves as an information center for city and state attractions. The tours take 60 to 90 minutes; allow at least another 30 minutes to browse around on your own after the tour. Highlights of the grounds are detailed in a brochure available at the tour desk. Note: For security reasons, your bag will be searched when you enter.If you're visiting in December or January, take note of two special treats: A beautifully decorated 40-foot tree adorns the rotunda at Christmas, and on January 15, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, there's a memorial program featuring speeches by local dignitaries, including the governor.

Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History
Previously the Kennesaw Civil War Museum, this museum is now operated in association with The Smithsonian Institute, which means that Civil War and transportation objects from the Smithsonian will be incorporated into the exhibits here.It was here that the wild adventure known as the "Great Locomotive Chase" began. The Civil War had been under way for a year on April 12, 1862, when Union spy James J. Andrews and a group of 21 Northern soldiers disguised as civilians boarded a locomotive called the General in Marietta, buying tickets for diverse destinations to avert suspicion. When the train made a breakfast stop at the Lacy Hotel in Big Shanty, they seized the locomotive and several boxcars and fled northward to Chattanooga. The goal of these daring raiders was to destroy tracks, telegraph wires, and bridges behind them, thus cutting off the Confederate supply route between Virginia and Mississippi.Conductor William A. Fuller, his breakfast interrupted by the sound of the General chugging out of the station, gave chase on foot, then grabbed a platform car and poled along the tracks. With him were a railroad superintendent and the General's engineer. At the Etowah River, Fuller and crew commandeered a small locomotive called the Yonah and made better progress. Meanwhile, the raiders tore up track behind them, and when the pursuers got close, the raiders slowed them down by throwing ties and firewood onto the tracks. Andrews, a very smooth talker, managed to convince station attendants en route that he was on an emergency mission running ammunition to Confederate General Beauregard in Mississippi.Fuller's chances of catching the General improved when he seized the southbound Texas and began running it backward toward the raiders, picking up reinforcements along the way and eventually managing to get a telegraph message through to Gen. Danville Leadbetter, commander at Chattanooga. The chase went on, with Andrews sending uncoupled boxcars careening back toward Fuller as obstructions. Fuller, who was running in reverse, merely attached the rolling boxcars to his engine and kept on. At the covered Oostanaula Bridge, the raiders detached a boxcar and set it on fire in hopes of finally creating an impassable obstacle -- a burning bridge behind them. But the Texas was able to push the flaming car off the bridge. It soon burned out, and Fuller tossed it off the track and continued.By this time the General was running low on fuel and water, the Texas was hot on its heels, and the raiders realized that all was lost. Andrews gave his final command: "Jump off and scatter! Every man for himself!" All were captured and imprisoned within a few days. Some escaped, others were exchanged for Confederate prisoners of war, and the rest were hanged in Atlanta, most of them at a site near Oakland Cemetery. Though the mission failed, the raiders, some of them posthumously, received the newly created Medal of Honor for their valor.The museum, occupying a building that was once the Frey cotton gin, houses the General (still in running condition, but don't get any ideas); a walk-through caboose; exhibits of Civil War artifacts, memorabilia, and photographs (including those relating to the chase and its participants); and exhibits on railroads. You can view a 20-minute narrated video about the chase, but if you really want the full story, rent the Disney movie The Great Locomotive Chase, starring Fess Parker as the dashing Andrews. (You can also buy a copy in the museum gift shop.)The museum is 3 miles from Kennesaw Mountain/National Battlefield Park, so consider visiting both of these Civil War-related sights the same day.


Make your reservations for discount hotel rooms in the Atlanta area, including:

Ansley Inn
This 1907 yellow brick Tudor mansion, the former estate of department-store magnate George Muse, is located in Ansley Park, one of the city's most beautiful residential areas. Rooms in the main house are nicely decorated with antique pieces and mahogany four-poster beds. Several rooms have oak floors, some adorned with Oriental rugs, and a few have lofty cathedral ceilings and working fireplaces. The Ansley Room, on the third floor, offers a canopy bed (which is unfortunately rather narrow) and an interestingly angled ceiling. The rooms in what is called the "corporate wing" (actually just an addition out back) are not nearly as charming (in fact, they resemble motel rooms). One room is wheelchair-accessible.A full hot southern breakfast is served in a dining room furnished with a long English Chippendale-style table and Empire sideboards. Guests enjoy a welcome cocktail upon arrival as well as a nightly wine and cheese social in the beautiful living room, which boasts an 8-foot ceramic tile fireplace.

Ritz-Carlton Atlanta
Without a doubt, this is Atlanta's finest downtown hotel. With Persian rugs gracing marble floors, silk-tapestried and African mahogany-paneled walls hung with a collection of 18th- and 19th-century paintings, and valuable antiques throughout its public areas, it's hard to believe that the Ritz was built as late as 1984. The impeccable service also harks back to another, more gracious era; you'll be cosseted as never before. Elegant rooms, many with bay windows, are furnished with beautiful mahogany pieces, and some have four-poster beds. Four rooms have been modified to be accessible to travelers with disabilities.All Ritz-Carlton restaurants are a treat to dine in, and the Atlanta Grill is no exception. Overlooking all the action along Peachtree Street, Atlanta Grill specializes in Chef Peter Zampaglione's Southern-inspired cuisine, including grilled game and seafood. Diners can count on a club-like, warm atmosphere, and the soothing sounds of live jazz in house every night. The Atlanta Grill is a popular Atlanta dining choice with both guests and non-guests.

Stone Mountain Park Campground
Nestled in the woods, this large campground with sections for pop-ups, RVs, and tents is a great place to stay. The area has many sites overlooking the lake, especially in the tent section. All sites have barbecue grills, and picnic tables are scattered throughout the area. Public facilities include a dining pavilion, playgrounds, laundries, and showers. The park's beach is close by, and the swimming pool is brand new. Pets are permitted if kept on a leash. This is a popular place, so be sure to call ahead. You may reserve a spot up to 90 days before you stay; all reservations must be made at least 1 week in advance.


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Other direct flights to Atlanta (ATL) on Delta Airlines

Flights from Baltimore (BWI)
Flights from Chicago (ORD)
Flights from Cincinnati (CVG)
Flights from Cleveland (CLE)
Flights from Greenville/Spartanburg (GSP)
Flights from Las Vegas (LAS)
Flights from Louisville (SDF)
Flights from Miami (MIA)
Flights from Salt Lake City (SLC)
Flights from Toronto, Canada (YYZ)

 

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